And Then There Were None

By Agatha Christie

Directed by Mark E. Schuster
October 23 to November 8, 2009


Read the Reviews:

Waukesha Freeman

Photos:
Click on a photo to see a larger image

Photos By Carroll Studios Of Photography

Volunteer of the Production

Andy Lien

Sponsored In Part By

WCT projects are supported in part by a grant from the Wisconsin Arts Board with funds from the State of Wisconsin and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Cast (In Order Of Appearance) 

Kurt Magoon

Tom Rogers

Jenny Kosek

Ethel Rogers

Jeffrey S. Berens

Fred Narracott

Kelly Simon

Vera Claythorne

Andy Lien

Phillip Lombard

Kyle Konetzke

Anthony Marston

Michael Endter

William Blore

Jim Volden

General MacKenzie

Scott Allen

Lawrence Wargrave

Mina Miller

Emily Brent

Joel Marinan

Edward Armstrong

Production Staff 

Director and Set Decorator

Mark E. Schuster

Stage Manager

Kristen Raduenz

Scenic Designer and Master Carpenter

A.J. Simon

Costume Designer

Sharon Sohner

Lighting Designer

David B. Carter

Sound Designer

Kevin Czarnota

Properties Designer

Kris Kingstad

Wig Master

Anthony Mackie

Director’s Assistant

Jeffrey S. Berens

Set Construction Crew

Joel Marinan
Debbie Volden
Jim Volden

'And Then There Were None ' will keep you guessing

By JULIE McHALE - TimeOut Theater Critic
October 30, 2009

As the characters drift into the beautifully appointed island mansion, each one gives off a certain aura. We immediately start forming our impressions. They are all strangers to us, as well as to each other except for the butler and his wife. But they, too, are new to this job and to the arriving guests. There’s already lots of mysteries, and many more to come.

Agatha Christie, probably the most successful creator of mysteries of all time, has again kept us guessing until the end in her popular "And Then There Were None," now playing at the Waukesha Civic Theatre. This is a very engrossing production, to say the least.

The supposed owners of the house, Mr. and Mrs. Owen, have invited these guests to spend a weekend at this spectacular but isolated retreat. But they themselves are not present.

In the midst of the rather awkward, alcohol-driven orientation among the newly-arrived guests, a voice suddenly interrupts the proceedings, and this voice and its message changes the atmosphere from somewhat uncomfortable to decidedly ominous.

A varied assemblage of characters comprises this selected group of invitees, and it takes a while before we ascertain the thread of commonality that unites them.

The hired hostess, Vera, beautiful and poised, tries to put people at ease, but the judgmental Emily refuses to enter in as she busies herself with castigating the whole human race for its immorality. Dr. Armstrong is as nervous as the ex-soldier Philip and ex-cop William are cocky.

General MacKenzie seems lost both socially and mentally, while Judge Wargrave treats this new world as his courtroom, one which he likes to control.

The nervous maid and confident butler have their own lives beneath the surface of this gathering while the fast-living, amoral Marston makes a brief appearance and manages to rile the doctor mightily.

With such a collection of personalities, now shaken by a daunting message, soon to be stranded by a storm, a power outage and no avenues of communication with the outside world, the possibilities for drama are endless. And Christie explores them all.

The title suggests that the weekend guests will start disappearing just as the rhyme over the mantle predicts, but who, why and how are the unanswered questions. Clarity is right around the bend, or is it? Just when we think we’ve got some things figured out, Christie plays with our expectations and speculations again.

Fine casting, effective pacing and blocking characterize the show.

The set designed by A.J. Simon, with its many levels and indoor and outdoor spaces, contributes much to the movement and composition of characters. It also exudes wealth and style.

Though the whole cast is competent, several stood out. Kelly Simon as Vera (hostess), Andy Lien as Phillip (soldier), Michael Endter as William (cop), and Scott Allen as Lawrence (judge) deserve the gold stars in this one.

It was a coup for Director Mark E. Schuster to put together this difficult, but fascinating drama.

Review Title

By Reviewer Name
Posted: Month 16, 2012

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Review Title

By Reviewer Name - WaukeshaNOW Theater Critic
Month 12, 2012

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Volunteer of the Production - Andy Lien

Andy's willingness to do whatever was necessary helped to make this show a success. He even agreed to take on the curtain speech without hesitation even though he had one of the more demanding roles in the show. He showed the highest level of professionalism in everything he did; always making sure that his actions made things better for the other actors on stage. "He was a real trouper."